Review: Ayesha At Last

Review: Ayesha At Last

Rating: ★★★★☆ (4/5)

Ayesha’s dream of being a poet is on a standstill as she’s stuck paying off a debt to her uncle. So while she’s stuck being a substitute teacher, she’s also tailing behind her gorgeous cousin who has marriage proposals thrown at her every day. An identity mishap leads her to be in charge of a fundraising conference for the young Muslims at their local mosque and pairs up with Khalid Mirza to run it. Khalid is conservative and judgemental with secrets of his own. Why should Ayesha fall for a man who acts above her? But a surprise engagement blows everything out of the water.

I enjoyed this book a lot more than I had expected. Like, wow. I couldn’t get enough Ayesha and her family. And her hilarious antics as she falls further down a web of lies by pretending to be her cousin. Each character was so unique and likeable. The narration jumps between different people. It was a bit too much, but each character has a distinct voice that separated them all, voices that were authentic and funny.

Khalid was the one that took me a while to get used to. I didn’t even think he deserved Ayesha for a good half of the novel. He just reminded me of most Muslim men I’ve met who are pretty ridiculous and judgemental before getting to know anyone. You can tell from the offset he’s grown to follow whatever his mum agrees to because of some background events that happened with his sister. And he does learn to become less judgemental, but when I say it took a while, it took a long while.

Apart from the growing relationship between Ayesha and Khalid, multiple complex conflicts grow in the back that adds to this drama-filled debut. Weddings to be planned and had, gossiping aunties that get their due and a very unexpected twist at the end.

Overall, I really enjoy Ayesha At Last. I think this book addressed so many issues and was so well done in that aspect. Workplace racism, Islamophobia, and double standards that women face. A great window into Muslim communities that explored the complexities of life, family and belief. Ayesha At Last was refreshing and hilarious.


Goodreads | Amazon | Book Depository | Author

Content warning: workplace racism, Islamophobia, revenge porn

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Blog Tour: Love From A to Z

Blog Tour: Love From A to Z

Rating: ★★★★★ (5/5)

*I received a copy via the publisher via NetGalley in return for an honest review. This in no way affected my opinion of the book.*

Zayneb is sent packing after confronting her Islamophobic teacher, and while her parents hope her early trip will do her some good, she doesn’t anticipate meeting Adam. Adam’s shouldering a secret that he fears will break his family apart. With nothing in common but a journal of Marvel and Oddities, destiny means little to Zayneb, but it seems like it’s working its hardest to keep them on the same path.

This book has so much brilliance packed into it, and I honestly don’t know where to start.

Zayneb is a headstrong lead, who comes across quite bitter at first glance. But I felt for her and saw myself in her in every way possible. When I was younger, I was very much like her: constantly angry at the prejudice, racism and Islamophobia in the world. She doesn’t know how to stay down quietly, and I admire that. I was never brilliantly outspoken the way she is, but her anger at the world is so relatable. Her story is remarkably lifelike and is an excellent portrayal of what it is like to be visibly Muslim today.

Continue reading “Blog Tour: Love From A to Z”

#RamadanReadathon 2019 TBR

#RamadanReadathon 2019 TBR

I’m so excited to be sharing my TBR for this year’s #RamadanReadathon! I’ve been wanting to join this ever since its start but Ramadan, the last few years, has always fallen during the same months as exam season. Now, that I’m little more organised that I have been in the last few years, I’ve already started/ completed my assignment for this year so I can join this year without deadlines looming behind my head.

The main focus of this readathon is to celebrate and support Muslim authors during the holy month of Ramadan.The main focus this year is a bingo board that is themed around the five pillars of Islam. Each pillar has four different prompts and one free space to complete! To participate in this reading challenge, you must choose one or more of the pillars to complete and, beginning at the bottom, work your way up the board.

MY TBR (the Salah pillar)

A Torch Against the Night (An Ember in the Ashes, #2)

BOOK IN A SERIES
A Torch Against the Night (An Ember in the Ashes #2)
Elias and Laia are running for their lives. After the events of the Fourth Trial, Martial soldiers hunt the two fugitives as they flee the city of Serra and undertake a perilous journey through the heart of the Empire.


I actually read the first book in this series, An Ember in the Ashes, back in it’s pre-release days. I remember really enjoying this book and thinking that I had to immediately read the next book. That was back in 2015! I think this book has been on my TBR for too long! A reread maybe in order or finding a recap because it’s been a long four years and I can’t remember anything.

Exit West

Free Space
Exit West

In a city far away, bombs and assassinations shatter lives every day. Yet, even here, hope renews itself, welling up through the rubble. Somewhere in this city, two young people are smiling, hesitating, sharing cheap cigarettes, speaking softly then boldly, falling in love.


My university works with the Booker Prize foundation on a scheme that gives students books to read each year. This was their 2018 pick. We call it the Big Read and I also had an opportunity to meet the author but my sister and her in-laws came to visit so I couldn’t attend. 🙁

Secrets of the Henna Girl

Contemporary Fiction
Secrets of the Henna Girl

Zeba Khan is like any other sixteen-year-old girl: enjoying herself, waiting for exam results… and dreaming of the day she’ll meet her one true love. Except her parents have other plans. In Pakistan for the summer, Zeba’s world is shattered. Her future is threatened by an unthinkable – and forced – duty to protect her father’s honour.


This one has been on my Kindle for so long and I never found the time to read it. So glad I found the opportunity now!

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Recently released
We Hunt The Flame

War is brewing, and the Arz sweeps closer with each passing day, engulfing the land in shadow. When Zafira embarks on a quest to uncover a lost artifact that can restore magic to her suffering world and stop the Arz, Nasir is sent by the king on a similar mission: retrieve the artifact and kill the Hunter. But an ancient evil stirs as their journey unfolds—and the prize they seek may pose a threat greater than either can imagine.


This is actually released in May and I’m grateful for it’s placement in the chart because I think I’ll be in the position to read it right away on release day!

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Name in the title
Amina’s Voice

Amina has never been comfortable in the spotlight. She is happy just hanging out with her best friend, Soojin. Except now that she’s in middle school everything feels different. Soojin is suddenly hanging out with Emily, one of the “cool” girls in the class, and even talking about changing her name to something more “American.” Does Amina need to start changing too? Or hiding who she is to fit in? While Amina grapples with these questions, she is devastated when her local mosque is vandalized.


Another book that’s been on my TBR for too long! Time to fix that!

Well, that’s my TBR for #RamadanReadathon 2019! Are you taking part this year? If so, which pillar(s) are you aiming to complete?

Monthly Rewind: April 2019

Monthly Rewind: April 2019

B O O K S

During the month of April, I read 4 books. (It’s actually 7, but I collapsed Our Dreams at Dusk because it’s in Manga volumes)

Book covers (left to right): Summer Bird Blue by Akemi Dawn Bowman, Hate To Want You by Alisha Rai, The Rise and Fall of the Amir Sisters by Nadiya Hussain and Our Dreams at Dusk by Yuhki Kamatani.

Summer Bird Blue
“It was just so heartfelt and emotional, especially the last quarter had me in tears. A story about a girl exploring her grief, but also a story about family and friendship. A brilliant character-driven novel that really hit all the right notes .” My review

Hate to Want You
Everyone I follow has read this book. It’s a little more steamy than I would’ve liked but the family drama was to die for and I was on edge.

The Fall and Rise of the Amir Sisters
Eh, I’m not too sure about this. I love Nadiya but this book was just so weird. I found the sisters to be so unlikeable at some points. Mae was a disappointment and the attempt to portray her as a teen today really flopped. (Her texting was so irritating and illegible at some points. I don’t want to sound like an adult complaining about teens in fiction but in 2019 are most eighteen-year-olds really texting like this? “Nt doom. Better nt jinx uni. L8ers! Xxxx”)

Our Dreams at Dusk
A short manga about a gay teen who is scared he’s been outed. He meets a mysterious woman and finds himself joining (a sort of) club. The depiction of different LGBT+ characters was honestly so amazing. It’s so short but so impactful. The art is so beautiful.

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My Favourite Things About Breath of the Wild

My Favourite Things About Breath of the Wild

Just over two years ago Nintendo released The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild (BotW) on the Nintendo Wii U and the Nintendo Switch. And almost five months ago, I bought the Switch version and fell in love. Please note: This post will have spoilers from throughout the game.

Growing up, I wasn’t allowed to play games. The closest game I could play as a kid was The Sims. And even then, my parents hated that I spent so much time on it. My older brother, on the other hand, has grown up with the privilege of being the first son and that meant he was allowed to play whatever he wanted. And that meant excluding us, the younger siblings, from playing anything because it would cut into his game time. So, my experiences of games as a child was always through the view of a bystander.

I had watched my brother play most of the Zelda franchise and when I grew out of being the bystander, I turned to YouTubers who would post their walkthroughs online. When we had first bought Breath of the Wild (BotW), it was on the Wii U. I remember being captivated by getting to experience a Zelda game for myself, with me in control and not someone else.

But then school came first, I couldn’t play much and by the time, I got around to picking it up, my brothers had decided to sell all our Wii U games in order to buy the Switch. I had, of course, played games on the Switch but most of them were either shooting or platform games. It wasn’t until last year December that I came across a BotW video and I realised that I had to play it again. Now that I’m older, and with a job, playing games is a little easier now. Sure, my mum would cuss me out for spending money on games, but I didn’t care. So, I bought it and I cannot explain how captivated I was by the game. Don’t get me wrong, I have nothing against platform or shooter games, but it just wasn’t my style. Most of the ones I had played, I found them too fast paced and I didn’t enjoy the speed.

BotW was truly the game made for me. It was adventurous and fast-paced in a way that didn’t overwhelm me. The way the entire world was unstructured allowed me to move in a pace that worked for me. The beauty of BotW was that there was no one set pathway. I’ve seen hundred of videos ranging from people finishing the game 100% to people waking Link and rushing straight to Ganon. I’m over 150 hours into my gameplay and I still feel like I haven’t discovered everything in the game.

But, in honour of the games two-year anniversary, I wanted to share some of my favourite places and parts in Breath of the Wild, whether that be a side quest, location or person. My initial list went well over the twenty mark, so I decided to whittle it down to just ten, which was hard enough.

A Gift of Nightshade (Side Quest)

This side quest is located in the Faron Region and I found it by accident. It’s a pretty simple quest, you basically become a matchmaker for a Hylian and a Gerudo by giving the Gerudo woman a flower. I only climbed up this mountain because I was making my way to Faron Tower to unlock the map, and a Yiga clan members was on my tail and I did not have the hearts nor food to deal with him, so up I went. And there I found these two people standing at opposite ends of a river. At first glance, I was wary because I had expected something bad to happen to me. But then I went up to the Hylian to find that he was just being a chicken and couldn’t work up the courage to talk to a girl he liked. It made me laugh. The game, for those who don’t know, is set years after Ganon had ruined the Kingdom, villages and safe spots were sparse with Guardians and camps of enemies in most of the world. At first, I found it so odd, but I instantly loved it. And it’s a prime example of what makes BotW so good. There was something good to be found in even the strangest of places.

source: Nintendo (gif made by me)
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First Ten Books I Reviewed

First Ten Books I Reviewed

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly feature once hosted by The Broke and the Bookish, but has now moved to That Artsy Reader Girl! Each week, a new topic is put into place and bloggers share their top ten (or your own amount) accordingly.

This week’s topic is First Ten Books I Review. I initially wanted to make this a booktube video, but the timing was a real struggle. One day, inshaAllah. I tried to use this week to reflect on my older reviews, and what do I remember about said book and what do I think about it today.

Girl Online by Zoe Sugg

Okay, wow, I completely forgot that this was the book that kickstarted my blog. I remember angrily typing this review at 12 am. I was slightly disappointed when I discovered that Zoella used a ghostwriter to help with her book. I don’t think I mentioned it in my review, but I actually have no issue with celebrities using ghostwriters but when you fail to mention it is where I found problems with. I have to admit this book has completely fallen off my radar so rereading my review made me laugh so much.

The Song of Achilles

Honestly, this is probably the only book on this list that I still reread to this day. Iconic, beautiful and amazing.

The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake

WHY DO I HAVE NO MEMORY OF WRITING THIS? But it looks like I didn’t enjoy it at all.

Carter Reed

Okay, this one made me laugh a lot. I read this in college as a part of a buddy read with a friend. I believe we found this on BookBub.com where we randomly chose books of the emails we received and reviewed. I do not have any fond memories of this, and I’d instead not reread it.

The Fault in Our Stars

When I started my book blog, and I really started it with the intention that I was reading for me. During my teens, everything I “enjoyed” was because my friends introduced me to it. And TFiOS was one of them. To be honest, I have no issue with John Green, but I honestly don’t like his books and I kind of regret forcing myself to enjoy them because my friends did. I actually had a more positive review on my old Goodreads account, but I replaced it with this one because I couldn’t in good faith keep recommending it when I didn’t actually enjoy it.

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