Book Review: Song of Blood and Stone

Book Review: Song of Blood and Stone

 Rating: ★★★☆☆ (3/5)

* I received an ARC of this book from the publisher through NetGalley.  This in no way affected my opinion of the book.

Song of Blood & Stone is a historical fantasy that follows Jasminda, a mixed-race girl, who finds herself in the middle of a war after saving a stranger with her magic, known as Earthsong. The land it’s set in is separated into two areas: one belonging to the Lagamiri (those with magic) and Elsira (those without). Jasminda is an outcast, despite belonging to both worlds, but her dark skin in Elsira leaves her to lead a life in isolation. 

This was a fascinating read I have to say. I wasn’t expecting much, but I left more satisfied than I had expected. The story parallels to many moments in history, but more closely to our times today, and how refugees are treated and negative media bias. We see how Jasminda is affected and how Jack, the white male lead, learns to use his privilege to do better than his peers and ancestors. It also discusses abuse, erasure and systematic oppression.  

I have to say it did take some time getting into the story and understanding the general plot. The romance was overwhelming and felt a bit forced, more like we were told to like them as a couple rather than growing to love them together, which may be because of the rushed ending. There wasn’t as much world building incorporated as you would expect from a fantasy book, I hope this to be built upon in the next books since I felt a bit puzzled in the first half of the book. 

Overall, I really enjoyed this. I’ve been in search of a new fantasy series, and I think maybe what I’m looking for. 

 

Trigger/Content Warnings: attempted rape, violence, death, sexual content and war themes. If you’ve read this and feel like I missed something out, tell me!

 

 

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Monthly Rewind: April 2018

B O O K S

monthlyrewind_april18

The Cruel Prince by Holly Black (2/5) – I’ve decided not to write a write for this one since I’m trying to limit the number of negative reviews I write but I really did not enjoy this one. Which is a shame since I do usually like the books Book Twitter recommends. There’s nothing that really gripped me but it was well written and mildly entertaining at some points. But what really didn’t stick with me was the possible love interest going from almost killing Jude and allowing others to bully her into falling in love with her.

Come to the Rocks by Christin Haws (5/5) –

Midnight Sun by Trish Cook (2/5) – A novelisation of the 2018 movie that made never want to see the film.

Animal Farm by George Orwell (4/5) –  I finally managed to get around to reading Animal Farm. I’ve always known the plot and had seen the animated movie but never really got around to reading the actual book?

Continue reading “Monthly Rewind: April 2018”

Book Review: Come to the Rocks

Book Review: Come to the Rocks

Rating: ★★★★★ (5/5)

* I received an ARC of this book from the publisher through NetGalley. This in no way affected my opinion of the book.

Linnea’s favourite spot is an area on a rocky shoreline where one misstep can catapult her straight into the sea. Despite its danger, this is where she meets and falls in love with, a mermaid called Mren. But Linnea’s ex-boyfriend threatens the only thing Linnea loves, and she must do something before it goes too far.

Haws has something special here. This short story is incredible and manages to pack an exciting yet terrifying story into a mere 66 pages.

The story moves between Linnea’s time at sea and her life outside of her spot where she is constantly harassed by Mikey. Outside of the fantasy elements, the novella highlights the importance of taking abuse victims seriously. There are multiple moments where Linnea’s reports of her boyfriend aren’t taken seriously and there is a lack of care when it came to punishing harassers.

I only have one complaint. This deserves to be a full-length novel. It has so much potential for a full-length novel, which would’ve allowed for longer and more detailed development between Linnea and Mren. (and space for Mren’s history – her past history is a story in itself)

Overall, it’s an interesting read about mermaids and revenge. Short, yet enjoyable. 


GOODREADS | AMAZON | PUBLISHER

Trigger warning: Domestic abuse, physical abuse, toxic relationships, harassment and stalking. (If you’ve read the book and felt like I’ve missed something out, please tell me!!)

Frequently Used Words In Young Adult/Fantasy Titles

Frequently Used Words In Young Adult/Fantasy Titles

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly feature once hosted by The Broke and the Bookish, but has now moved to That Artsy Reader Girl! Each week, a new topic is put into place and bloggers share their top ten (or your own amount) accordingly.

My frequently used word is “and bone”. There’s probably way more to add to this list but since I’m rushing this week’s post, I’ve stopped at six because these were the first ones that came to mind. University assignments are due so soon so I’ll be pretty infrequent in the upcoming weeks.

TTT_frequentlyusedwords_books

Ink and Bone by Rachel Caine
Shadow and Bone by Leigh Bardugo
Ivory and Bone by Julie Eshbaugh
Flesh and Bone by Jonathan Maberry

 

 

TBR Waitlist

TBR Waitlist
Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly feature once hosted by The Broke and the Bookish, but has now moved to That Artsy Reader Girl! Each week, a new topic is put into place and bloggers share their top ten (or your own amount) accordingly.
This is according to my newer GoodReads account that I made in 2014: the books that have been on my TBR the longest.

TTT_waitlist_1

  1. Lord of the Flies – William Golding
  2. The Night Circus – Erin Morgenstern
  3. Shatter Me – Tahereh Mafi
  4. To Kill a Mockingbird – Harper Lee
  5. A Clockwork Orange – Anthony Burgess

    TTT_waitlist_2

  6. Rot & Ruin – Jonathan Maberry
  7. The Forest of Hands and Teeth – Carrie Ryan
  8. Feed – Mira Grant
  9. Life of Pi – Yann Martel
  10. I’ll Give You the Sun – Jandy Nelson

Mini-review: The Unit & One of Us is Lying

Rating: ★★☆☆☆ (2/5)

* I received a copy of The Unit from the publisher through NetGalley. This in no way affected my opinion of the book.

Set in future where the elderly become dispensable (women at 50, men at 60) and are placed into the Reserve Bank Unit where they’re expected to live the rest of their lives. They’re fed well, clothed and have access to many social activities. In return for the comfortable lifestyle, they must partake in medical trials and donate their organs when needed until the final one. The longer you contribute, the longer you live.

The Unit is quite sad since it asks the question of what makes a person indispensable? Why does someone’s life mean less because it doesn’t conform to what’s required? And the government in this book tries to cover it up by treating the people who enter the Unit well. There are a few sweet moments as Dorrit makes new friends and finds a love she never had outside and despite the circumstances, they have a place where they finally fit.

The Unit is an interesting idea but there were so many plot holes and moments of ambiguity that brought down the story a lot.


Rating: ★★★☆☆ (3/5)

If One of Us is Lying was a tv show, everyone would’ve finished the entire series in a day. (Most likely would receive similar hype as Riverdale and 13RW) Five students enter detentions, but only four come out alive and become prime suspects for the death of the fifth person. Simon, the one who died, ran a blog that exposed everyone’s dirty secrets and had a secret for each suspect. McManus did a damn good job in this. Using very stereotypical aspects of a high school, she gave the characters more depth and substance than I had expected. McManus is very good at writing suspense and making the reader question everything. It’s sort of a mash up between The Breakfast Club, Gossip Girl and Pretty Little Liars.

But that’s all the good things I have to say about the series. The first half was thrilling and fun but towards the end it became so disappointing. Using someone’s sexuality and having them be outed against their will shouldn’t have been treated as a plot twist. Their sexuality shouldn’t be something shocking. Also, villainising mental illness was an instant no-no for me. (Trina @ Between Chapters has a more thorough review. There was another I had read but I’ll link once I find it again)

Content warning: a character being outed against their will, harmful rep of mental illness.