Longest Books I’ve Ever Read

Longest Books I’ve Ever Read
Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly feature once hosted by The Broke and the Bookish, but has now moved to That Artsy Reader Girl! Each week, a new topic is put into place and bloggers share their top ten (or your own amount) accordingly.

As per the title, these are the ten longest books I’ve read. I’ve excluded a couple for many reasons, for example, I didn’t put down Deathly Hallows because there wasn’t much of a difference between Order of the Phoenix and I excluded non-fiction books I’ve read for school and university.

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1. Les Misérables

Jean Valjean—the noble peasant imprisoned for stealing a loaf of bread—Les Misérables ranks among the greatest novels of all time. In it, Victor Hugo takes readers deep into the Parisian underworld, immerses them in a battle between good and evil, and carries them to the barricades during the uprising of 1832 with a breathtaking realism that is unsurpassed in modern prose.

2. A Game of Thrones

Long ago, in a time forgotten, a preternatural event threw the seasons out of balance. In a land where summers can last decades and winters a lifetime, trouble is brewing. The cold is returning, and in the frozen wastes to the north of Winterfell, sinister and supernatural forces are massing beyond the kingdom’s protective Wall. At the center of the conflict lie the Starks of Winterfell, a family as harsh and unyielding as the land they were born to. Sweeping from a land of brutal cold to a distant summertime kingdom of epicurean plenty, here is a tale of lords and ladies, soldiers and sorcerers, assassins and bastards, who come together in a time of grim omens.

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ASTRO (아스트로) 2ND MAKESTAR PHOTOBOOK UNBOXING

ASTRO (아스트로) 2ND MAKESTAR PHOTOBOOK UNBOXING

Today’s post is going to be a little different. I’ve decided to do an unboxing review of ASTRO’s Second Makestar Photobook. For those who don’t know ASTRO, they are a six-member K-Pop boy group, and they are my absolute favourite!

I became a fan around the time the first photobook was happening. But I never bought it because of 1. I hadn’t yet realised how much I would love them and their music yet 2. I actually couldn’t afford the photobook at the time. So when the second time came around, I knew I had to purchase one!

I will include a youtube video I made of me unboxing the photobook, the toy stamps and the extra goodies we received every time we reached a stretch goal. (We received photo cards, postcards, bookmarks and then a poster) I also do a little flip through of the book. (Not all of the book though, it’s pretty massive and would’ve made the video twenty minutes long) I did intend this to be a speaking unboxing but I, unfortunately, was sick at the time of filming but imagine me fangirling as I go through the goods because I was!

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Review: How She Likes It

Review: How She Likes It

Rating: ★★★★☆ (4/5)

* I received an ARC of this book from the author. This in no way affected my opinion of the book.

Isabel Alfonso is next in line to be CEO of her family-owned company. But she’s also risking her own business to take it. There are a hundred things that need to be done before the deal is sealed and Isabel is in dire need of an assistant. It’s not her fault the first person in the door happens to be the same man she had a one night stand with the very night before. Single dad Adam Sevilla is just going by, raising his daughter while also allowing her to reconnect with her distant mother. 

There’s a lot to this book that I really liked. Isabel is a cool and unapologetic career-focused woman who doesn’t want to risk falling in love because of how it will affect her career. There are mentions of the double standards women face when they’re in the place of a CEO versus a man in the same position. “They were expected to have it all, but just enough that their partners didn’t feel intimidated.” Despite being raised to those closest to her as the enemy, her best relations are with them. She’s very quick-thinking and witty. I would definitely read more of her story if we’re ever given a chance.

Adam is a pretty interesting love interest, a single dad who adores his daughter. He’s continuously facing belittling comments from his ex, who questions his ability to raise their daughter. He really tries to do well by his daughter and is a sickly romantic at heart – with a penchant to quote one too many Star Wars related things. What else do you expect from a man who names his daughter Leia?

Isabel and Adam are two very different people, but they work well together. And so does this story. It’s pacing was well, and it was a relatively fun and enjoyable read that’s body-posi and tackles working against cultural norms. It gets pretty steamy in some moments, not really my thing, but I understand other readers will definitely have a different experience.

I think #romanceclass is something I’ve seen floating around Twitter for ages and Carla mentions it in her acknowledgements, and I finally had the good sense to find out what it means. The good thing is I’ve got a new list of people to read from, bad news for my TBR but we won’t mention that. 


 

GOODREADS | AMAZON | AUTHOR

Review: The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

Review: The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

Rating: ★★★★★ (5/5)

Years after making herself a household name, Evelyn Hugo is ready, to tell the truth about her rise to fame and what she’s done, and lost, to get there. But she’s shaking the journalism community by plucking unknown Monique Grant to write her story. But Monique is listening as Evelyn begins her tale in the cutthroat world that was Old Hollywood and the stories of her seven husbands along the way.

I am starstruck, honestly. This book isn’t my usual go-to read, but after hearing everyone talking about this, I knew I couldn’t miss this out. And I’m glad I didn’t. Seven Husbands indeed one of the best books I’ve read this year. I wasn’t expecting much because I hadn’t heard much about this book apart from “read it now”. It was a compelling read about race, sexuality, misogyny and how you shouldn’t use your short time on earth being someone you’re not.

Evelyn recalls her life to unknown journalist Monique Grant, starting from her roots: losing her mother and marrying a man (husband number one) to leave her the dead end city and into Hollywood to make her name with the stars. Evelyn is unapologetic and cunning. She learns to play the game and uses everything she can to prove herself. She’s her own saviour in a world that wants nothing more to do with her. I was so in love with her story. The story explores her Cuban heritage and bisexuality. And it is phenomenal. The writing and pacing are impeccable and had my heart racing with every page. This book really surprised me. Rarely do books steal my heart so quickly and within the first chapter.

Monique, in my opinion, was sorely underutilised. It’s not her fault that Evelyn’s story was so overpowering that it literally takes all your attention but a second read through is needed to appreciate her again. She’s an unknown journalist requested to write the biography of Hollywood’s greatest star. And she has no clue as to why she’s chosen. There are breaks between Evelyn’s chapters where we follow Monique as she processes what she learns from Evelyn and later we learn the bombshell in how she connects to the story.

Overall, this was an incredibly well-written story and an utterly brilliant novel. Honestly, if you’re in need of a new read, make sure to pick this one up.


GOODREADS| AMAZON | BOOK DEPOSITORY | AUTHOR

Content warning: the death of a loved one, mentions of suicide and miscarriage, unhealthy eating, abortion, domestic abuse, cheating, homophobia, biphobia, alcoholism. (If you’ve read this book and felt like I’ve missed something out, please, inform me.)

 

Review: The Book of M

Review: The Book of M

Rating: ★★★☆☆

* I received a copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley.  This in no way affected my opinion of the book.

A future where a global epidemic is spreading and causing the world’s population to lose their shadows and later their memories. Husband and wife duo Ory and Max have managed to hide from the brunt of the disasters. That is until Max loses her shadow. Armed with just a tape recorder to document her memories, Max leaves their abandoned hotel. And Ory sets out on a dangerous journey to reunite with his wife. The chapters alternate between the two and two others, another survivor and another person known as “The One Who Gathers.”

The Book of M is a messy read, and I mean that in a good way. A story where each chapter ends with another hundred questions to ask. We follow Ory and Max survive in different circumstances. Max is running anywhere Ory can’t find her and then goes in search with a group of people for a cure for her memory loss. Ory, in search of Max, ends up in various dangerous circumstances where he finally interacts with the world that he, up until now, had ignored under the safety of his area. He meets the good, the bad, makes new friends and finds old ones.

The Book of M was a strangely riveting read. The writing is vivid which compliments and adds the foreboding world building. The story starts with the world in an unknown position, and as the book switches between the four different perspectives, the world comes back to together, providing different views on a world almost forgotten. It read like a puzzle, one that slowly meshed together and once it did, it was an absolutely fantastic book to finish.

Overall, while I did have some issues with the pacing, especially towards the middle of the book, The Book of M was still an engaging and imaginative read.


GOODREADS | AMAZON BOOK DEPOSITORY

Content warning: blood, death, violence, the use of the “bury your gays” trope. I know I’m missing quite a bit but if you’ve read the book, please tell me if I’ve missed something out.

Review: Mirage

Review: Mirage

Rating: ★★★★☆ (4/5)
* I received an ARC of this book from the publisher through NetGalley. This in no way affected my opinion of the book.

Mirage is a Moroccan inspired tale about eighteen-year-old Amani’s dream of travelling the world almost comes true when the Vathek empire kidnaps her. She discovers she looks virtually identical to the half Vathek Princess. A princess so hated by the public that Amani is forced to become her body double, should someone take aim. Amani’s life is on the line as she must mirror the princess to perfection.

Where most would have failed to bring to life these characters, Daud flourishes. Each and every single one had such a strong and exciting presence. Amani and her reluctant friendship with Maram. Amani adjusting to her new role and lifestyle. The entire world and its system are so genuinely amazing. I dived into this thinking it was just a fantasy, but I was utterly surprised away by the sci-fi elements. It is absolutely fantastic. I truly enjoyed Maram, our stone cold princess whom Amani must mirror, the most. Perhaps this is the first time I’m genuinely captivated the villain. Don’t get me wrong, I hated her, but she is so exciting. The relationship dynamic between the two girls were so compelling and fascinating.

This book amazingly showcases the topic of family, culture and tradition. It addresses colonialism and the erasure of cultures and religions via oppression. It is a bit slower than what you’d expect for a fantasy, focusing on exploring the relationships as Amani has to decide whom she can trust but its character interactions and court politics scenes were some of the best in the book.

The books biggest downfall, but wasn’t as weak as it could’ve been, is the romance. Where most books fail is where Daud succeeded was making sure the romance wasn’t the be all and end all of this entire book. Everything else in is this book was so good that the romance, for me, was merely eclipsed that everything else that was good. It still worked in a way that didn’t overpower the narrative. But Amani and Idris can still tug at one’s heartstrings. Hell, even my cons of this book aren’t honestly cons.

Overall, Mirage is a solid debut which kicked off the duology with a strong narrative in a world of magic and danger. The danger and adventure Amani faces in this court that holds her prisoner makes Mirage an utterly captivating read.


GOODREADS | AMAZON | AUTHOR SITE

Content warning: kidnapping, physical abuse, war themes, death, murder, forced body alterations, oppression. (If you’ve read Mirage and felt like I’ve missed something out, tell me!)