Monthly Rewind: September 2018

monthlyrewind_september18_books

B O O K S 

I am so impressed with the fact that I managed to read 14 books this month. It was most likely spurred by the fact that I start my second year of university in October so I really wanted to read as much as I could before it’s limited by deadlines and essays.  Also, I’ve been cheeky and just stolen snippets from my own reviews for this post.

The Sun Is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon | (3/5) | TSIAAS is one of those books where I’m genuinely in the middle. Like I didn’t enjoy it, but I didn’t absolutely love it. I feel like there’s a bit of switch here for me. But it’s ending was really good and the way Nicola Yoon jumps into different bystander’s voices without affecting the main plot brilliantly done. I like how it showed we are all connected in some way or another

Circe by Madeline Miller |(4/5)| Miller’s ability to re-present the classics never fails to amaze me. Seven years since TSOA was first published, four years since I had read it, and I can definitely say that Circe was definitely worth the wait.

How She Likes It by Carla de Guzman |(5/5)| Isabel Alfonso is next in line to be CEO of her family-owned company. But she’s also risking her own business to take it. Single dad Adam Sevilla is just going by, raising his daughter while also allowing her to reconnect with her distant mother. Isabel and Adam are two very different people, but they work well together. And so does this story. Its pacing was well, and it was a relatively fun and enjoyable read.

Lions Can Always Learn to Roar (Until Lambs Become Lions, #2) by Charlotte Anne Hamilton |(5/5)| After nearly dying at the hands of the Sheriff of Nottingham, Robin Hood and her merry gang are on a deadline after the Queen Mother appears to have sent her people to Nottingham. Robin has no idea what’s ahead of her but she’ll do anything to keep her family safe. 

Margot & Me by Juno Dawson |(3/5)| Fliss and her mother move in with her cold grandmother. Fliss discovers the diary she kept during the war and learns all new secrets about her seemingly distant grandmother. I don’t know what, but this book just didn’t work for me.

Continue reading “Monthly Rewind: September 2018”

Advertisements

Review: The Darkest Minds

Review: The Darkest Minds

Rating: ★★★☆☆ (3/5)

A sickness spreads across the United States, killing a majority of its children and leaving its survivors with something uncontrollable that has the government shaking in fear. Swiftly taken from their parents, children are quickly taken away and placed in rehabilitation camps. Ruby was ten when she learnt that suppressing her skill keeps her alive. Six years later, Ruby escapes and on the run to find others like her.

The Darkest Minds has such a captivating concept. It’s a shame that it is so painfully slow. I’ll give applause to Chubs and Suzume who technically saved this book for me. The two that stood out the most for me. Without them, I wouldn’t even question my decision to not finish this series.

There’s a lot of confusion, especially when it came to worldbuilding. They gain these powers and are then categorised according to how much of a threat they are. Maybe the reason why these powers happen are revealed later down the line in the series, but there’s not much to keep you hanging but just completely confused. How a world is seemingly wiped out but still existing in some places like normal despite having locked up a majority of its youth population.

What even was the point of the romance in this? Honestly, I give most romances the benefit of the doubt but like how did Ruby and Liam even happen. She spends most of her time ignoring him, which is fair enough, but then suddenly with no warning, they’re all over each other. I just don’t think enough space was given to develop these two the way they deserved.

The narrative is an actual snail pace after Ruby escapes the first camp. There are multiple flashbacks. And even when it’s at a point where it should speed up, it’s just chapter after chapter of them on the least exciting road trip in the world. There’s a couple of car chases scenes to give us the illusion that something is happening.

There is a lot of good to this book, it wasn’t exactly terrible, I think the pacing just dragged this book to hell for me. I don’t understand how a book with a lot of plot aspects that I usually enjoy disappoint me like this.

I’m sort of in the middle of this series right now. TDM didn’t really do much for to compel me to want to continue its series. The ending was a bit of disappointment considering it chucks Ruby straight back to where she was 15% of the novel. But there’s a lot to like, a bit and pieces of it was really intriguing to me. The variety of powers and the shocking treatment these children receive. The found family aspect was a sweet shining moment in the rest of the dullness. I’ll sit on it, for now, maybe I’ll be interested later down the line to finish the series.


GOODREADS | AMAZON AUTHOR

Content warning: Violence, sexual assault, murder, gun violence, physical violence, PTSD, unchallenged ableist language.