Book Review: Dreadnought

Rating: ★★★★☆

* I received an ARC of this book from the publisher through NetGalley. This in no way affected my opinion of the book.

In a world where superheroes and villains are a regular occurrence, Danny finds herself being the passed the power of Dreadnought when he falls out of the sky and dies right in front of her. The side effects of this transform Danny’s body into what she thought it should be. To Danny, she now looks like the girl she knows she is even if everyone around her says otherwise. Dreadnought is her origin story which follows her first few weeks of superhero living. While trying to juggle her new life, she’s also trying to find the old Dreadnought’s murderer, who is still threatening the streets of New Port City.

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Book Review: Machination & Counterpart

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* I received an ARC of this book from the publisher through NetGalley.  This in no way affected my opinion of the book.

I originally read Machinations but never wrote a review for it and since then, I also got a Kindle copy of its sequel so I decided to do a double review.

Rating: ★★★☆☆

When I first requested this on NetGalley, I didn’t think much of it. I just wanted something sci-fi to read but, I have to admit, I was pretty impressed.

Plot-wise, I really liked it. This kind of plot had always low-key been my favourite. The Machination series is set in a post-apocalyptic world where machines have risen against humanity. Following Rhona Long when she is killed on a rescue mission gone and later wakes up in a new body, a clone of herself. While I wished the description of the machines themselves were more detailed (like the higher echelon) but I was quite satisfied with the overall way the world works.

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Book Review: A Boy Made of Blocks

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you can find the book at:
GoodReads Author’s website | Amazon | Buy The Book Now at The Book Depository, Free Delivery World Wide
Rating:  ★★★★★

~ARC provided by Netgalley in exchange for an honest review~

Thirtysomething Alex is struggling. Struggling to have a close relationship with his autistic son Sam. Struggling to hold onto his failing marriage. Struggling to come to terms with a childhood tragedy. During a trial separation, Alex moves in with his best friend Dan, wondering if his family could ever come back together.

I loved this. It was so good. I don’t know how many ways I can say how amazing this was. Sad, happy, heart-warming and heart-breaking. A BOY MADE OF BLOCKS is incredibly humorous and moving. It may sound gloomy, but it’s far from it. At the beginning, you sit there wondering if Alex will ever learn but he does. He learns from his mistakes. He changes his approach in handling Sam’s tantrums and understands his son’s fears. There were so many moving scenes in this. (Tears were streaming heavily when a certain thing was destroyed but my heart was warmed when it was fixed.) There were certain moments where Alex knows he shouldn’t yell at Sam but continues to do so and that really irked me. I guess it was for the sake of the plot, but I just didn’t like it.

The incorporation of Minecraft is one of the best parts of this book. People often unfairly associate Video Games with negative things. How it’s destroying this generation of people blah blah durr hburr techonology is bad kind of thing. But A BOY MADE OF BLOCKS shows one of the many positive things about video games and games like Minecraft. Minecraft provides an environment that encourages social interaction and helps people learn to communicate within the game’s well-defined rules.

Inspired by the author’s experiences with his own son, A BOY MADE OF BLOCKS is a heartfelt story of love and family.

Kindle Edition, 400 pages
Expected publication: September 1st 2016 by Sphere
ASIN:B010QDG9RI

Book Review: Wonder Women by Sam Maggs

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you can find the book at:
GoodReads | Author’s website | Amazon | Barnes and NobleBuy This Book from Book Depository, Free Delivery World Wide
Rating:  ★★★★★

In WONDER WOMEN, Sam Maggs introduces us to an array of female scientists, engineers, adventurers, and inventors—with portraits by Google doodler Sophia Foster-Dimino— and interviews with present-day woman working in STEM fields.

The worst thing about this entire thing was that I only knew five of these women. I felt so guilty with every page turn, and not knowing who any of these women were. And that’s why I enjoyed this. I love what Maggs did with this book. So many amazing women overcame such huge boundaries and obstacles to accomplish great things but yet remain virtually unknown to the general population. And most of what these women achieved, I knew the names of the men that took credit for their work.

But now I’ve learnt of so many amazing women from this great book. WONDER WOMEN has some great tales about some great women through history. I liked how Maggs managed to research all of these women. Written in a conversational style, with modern slang, (think Tumblr) I enjoyed how easy it was to read this. This is aimed mainly towards a younger audience but can still be read by all ages.

This is an important book that highlight women’s achievement throughout history. Like most, compulsory education tends to leave out knowledge of female scientists, poets, and politicians. So it was great to find material that not only doesn’t push them aside but highlight their greatness and place in history.

Expected publication: October 4th 2016 by Quirk Books
ASIN: B01AEPR4WW

Book Review: Radio Silence by Alice Oseman

25322449you can find the book at:
GoodReads
Author’s website
Buy This Book from Book Depository, Free Delivery World Wide
my review:
Rating:5star

*ARC received from Netgalley, in exchange for an honest review*

Frances only had one thing on her mind –  study and make it into one of the UK’s elite schools. But when she finds out her friend Aled is the mysterious voice behind her all-time favourite podcast she find a new sort of friendship in Aled and Universe City. But when it goes viral everything comes crashing down and Frances has to confront her past.

I really enjoyed Radio Silence. Although I do tend to stray away from YA novels that attempt to mix in fandom into its plot because I often find it doesn’t use fandom as well as it could. But I really enjoyed how Alice used fandom to show the beauty and danger of the internet while creating a solid novel about choices, and whichever path you take doesn’t matter, so long as you decide the course of your future. Frances’ experiences felt so true to me, as someone who is currently in the position she’s in- the transition from college to university is scary. Frances has such a great character development- from a quiet girl who doesn’t feel comfortable about talking what she likes to openly enjoying all the strange things she thought people would judge her for.

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Book Review: Time Travelling with a Hamster by Ross Welford

you can find the book at:
GoodReads
Amazon
Author website

my review:

Rating: ★★★★☆

~ARC provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review~

My dad died twice. Once when he was thirty nine and again four years later when he was twelve.

The first time had nothing to do with me. The second time definitely did, but I would never even have been there if it hadn’t been for his ‘time machine’…

On his twelfth birthday, Al Chaudhury recieved a letter from his deceased father which lead to the discovery of his dad’s old time machine and he finds himself going back to the 1980s in order to stop the chain of events that eventually leads to his dad’s death. Armed with only a series of letters and his pet hamster, Al discovers the dangers of time-travel in this new thrilling tale.

For a book that’s labelled Middle Grade, I was so impressed! I usually don’t read MG/Children’s fiction anymore but this story was so cute. From the very beginning its filled with suspense as Al takes us on this very wierd time traveling adventure. The characters were compelling and the scenes where Al meets his dad were so adorable.

Time Travelling is an easy read with funny moments that I know will be a great hit for its young audience.

Book Review: Sleeping Giants by Sylvain Neuvel (Themis Files #1)

25733990you can find the book at:

GoodReads
Amazon
Barnes & Noble
Author website

my review:

Rating: ★★★★☆

~ARC provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review~

When a young girl fell into a hole, no one expected to find her lying down on a large metal hand. Year later, that same girl is now helping to find, all over the planet, the missing pieces. Each uncovered from under the earth. They don’t know who put them there or the reason why. But through series of transcripts, conducted through an unknown voice, we follow a group of scientists and military personnel trying to assemble the pieces and uncover its strange powers.

I think this book maybe the weirdest I’ve read this year. But I liked it. I’ve been told its in the same format as World War Z and Illuminae, and now I’m seriously considering bumping those two up my TBR list.  The format itself makes it so interesting to read, and I’m loving this format! The premise is also fantastic. I love the idea of us humans scrambling over this gigantic  robot which is thousands of years more developed than us in terms of tech. There’s so much political, moral and ethical drama when they realise its potential as a weapon against alien forces.

However, although the science behind was so interesting to read. I did find myself dropping at some parts because the science jargon became too much, and felt so overwhelming. There was also a huge case of telling than showing, and  I think that just maybe because of the format, we don’t experience any of this with them (aside from a few scenes where it done over the phone) and only know what happens after it all actually happens.

Overall, what a book! Such a wild science fiction novel with an ending that made me so mad that I’m reading an ARC. I need the sequel now!

Kindle Edition, 320 pages
Expected publication: April 26th 2016 by Del Rey

ASIN: B015F0JSTS

Book Review: The Darkest Secret by Alex Marwood

26196106you can find the book at:

GoodReads
Amazon
Barnes & Noble (unavailable)
Author website

my review:

Rating: ★★★☆☆

~ARC provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review~

Sean Jackson’s three year old twin daughter, Coco, has gone missing leaving only Ruby and no one has a clue what happened. The media blames their mother, but what really happened to the little girl? The Darkest Secret plays over two weekends, set twelve years apart. The first is in 2004 where various friends and family are attending Sean’s 5oth birthday weekend while the second is set twelve years later during the weekend of Sean’s funeral.

This book was an intense read with engaging characters and drama that focuses on a terrible group of rich people. (for some reason, I can imagine this being a BBC program??) They were horrible- to themselves and to each other. I’ve never read a more self absorbed group of people like these, which makes it even more fascinating to read as you read on trying to figure out what happened and hopefully learn the truth behind the disappearance of Coco.

Marwood has written an relentless novel that creates a group of egoistic characters, and throughout the narrative there is a sense of complete horror as they reveal how far they will go. Overall, a thrilling novel which I felt had a slow start but once the story kicks in, it’s really compelling.

Format: ARC Kindle Edition
Expected publication: January 1st 2016 by Sphere
ASIN: B010RALUP6

 

Book Review: You Were Here by Cori McCarthy

you can find the book at:

GoodReads
Amazon
Barnes & Noble
Author website

my review:

Rating: ★★★★

~ARC provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review~

You Were Here is a surprisingly enjoyable novel and authentic. Told in alternating chapters from each of the five main character in a variety of ways. The main protagonist Jaycee’s are told in first person, while Zach and Natalie’s are in third. Bishop’s chapters are graffiti art, while Mik’s are graphic novel panels. The result is five clear and differentiated voices and a really refreshing way of reading a book.

Jaycee’s brother died five years ago when he snapped his neck doing a backflip off the top of a playground swing in front of Jaycee and others. Five years later, time hasn’t changed the Jake-sized hole she has in her life. Every year, on the anniversary of Jake’s death, Jaycee breaks into the ruins of an insane asylum, and meets up with Mik, Jake’s friend. But this year, Jaycee is joined by her ex-best friend Natalie, Natalie’s boyfriend Zach, and their friend Bishop. This was the beginning of a series of adventures when Jaycee finds Jake’s map of old buildings and hidden dares.

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Book Review: Firsts by Laurie Elizabeth Flynn

you can find the book at:

GoodReads
Amazon
Barnes and Noble
Author Website

goodreads summary:

Seventeen-year-old Mercedes Ayres has an open-door policy when it comes to her bedroom, but only if the guy fulfills a specific criteria: he has to be a virgin. Mercedes lets the boys get their awkward, fumbling first times over with, and all she asks in return is that they give their girlfriends the perfect first time- the kind Mercedes never had herself.

Keeping what goes on in her bedroom a secret has been easy- so far. Her absentee mother isn’t home nearly enough to know about Mercedes’ extracurricular activities, and her uber-religious best friend, Angela, won’t even say the word “sex” until she gets married. But Mercedes doesn’t bank on Angela’s boyfriend finding out about her services and wanting a turn- or on Zach, who likes her for who she is instead of what she can do in bed.

When Mercedes’ perfect system falls apart, she has to find a way to salvage her reputation and figure out where her heart really belongs in the process. Funny, smart, and true-to-life, FIRSTS is a one-of-a-kind young adult novel about growing up.

my review:

Rating: ★★★☆☆

~ARC provided by Netgalley in exchange for an honest review~
I’ll start with what I did like so it’s not lost in whatever comes next. The style of writing made it easy to read, it’s light and fluffy, and serious when it needs to be. Mercedes was an interesting main character, I didn’t like her, but it was nice to read a YA contemporary that’s quite different. Firsts make a lot of promises and the potential was so obvious.

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